Four warning signs for when it’s time to change jobs

Posted by | March 3, 2020 | Career changers, How to change jobs, Looking for work

Four warning signs when you know it’s time to change jobs

By Grant Verhoeven

You have come back from the weekend, sat at your desk and all you can think about is “I wish I wasn’t here”. This is a sign that it may be time to move on – the mojo of what you are doing is no longer there.

With fewer than 25% of Kiwis being fully engaged in their work, there are numbers of people sitting in roles that they either don’t like or to which they are unsuited. Don’t fall into feeling like you have to endure the day, just longing for 5pm to knock-off and start living life.

While moving on can be scary, there are ways to break out of the career comfort zone. But before you make the jump, consider these factors. Sometimes it may be as simple as tweaking some things in your current role, and those feelings of joy and satisfaction will return.

 

When was the last time you learnt something new?

Think back and consider what areas you have grown in recently or learnt about. While the routine can keep us safe, keeping on growing in a role is often an indicator of whether you are bored or engaged with your work. 

 

How long have you been complaining?

Sometimes we can have a bad day or even weeks, but if you have been negative for months, then there is a problem. If you find yourself struggling to think of the last day you enjoyed at work, then it is time to move on.

 

Have you explored the wiggle room in your role?

Wiggle room are the areas of a role that can be changed or tweaked. Sometimes this can be as easy as sitting down with your Manager, looking at the needs of the organisation and proposing a refocus on how you can better serve your role. 

In the TED talk  Secrets of people who love their roles, Shane Lopez notes that the 13% of people that loved their work didn’t land their dream job initially. Instead, they re-shaped parts of it to better suit their strengths, values and passions. 

 

What are your energy levels on the job?

If you are spending more time on social media than working, putting off tasks that need to be done or are having trouble identifying ongoing accomplishments, these are indicators that a job is getting old. 

 

REMEMBER

If you have decided that it is time to move on, don’t immediately quit your job and start looking for a new one. It is important to plan your departure and if possible, have a new position lined up before you quit your current job. It can sometimes take longer than you think to find a new role. It is often easier to find a new job when you are already in a role.

So make a coffee, sit back and take a moment to check-in on how you are feeling at work. While there is no single answer to how long you can stay, there will be clues pointing out whether you should stay or go.

 

Grant Verhoeven, Director and Career Advisor at Sparked Careers

Grant is a Wellington-based professional trainer, career and leadership coach who develops aspiring teams, managers and professionals to achieve their career objectives.

He works with people keen to take ownership of their career, whether it is to step up into a new role or look at stepping out into something new.

He is a professional member of the Career Development Association of New Zealand and has coached and trained over 1000 people to navigate their career journey.

Grant’s clients have included Autism New Zealand, Weta Digital, Rabobank and The Ministry for Primary Industries.

If you are keen to enquire about professional training or coaching, download his free ebook “Confusion to Clarity, 4 powerful steps to clarifying your next career move” at www.sparked.co.nz/guide

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